J. J. Keller Safety Management Suite Written Safety Plans
Written Safety Plans

WRITTEN SAFETY PLANS

To help simplify your safety efforts, the J. J. Keller® SAFETY MANAGEMENT SUITE offers 120+ pre-written safety plan templates for OSHA, EPA and DOT. Just choose your topic, fill out the form, and in minutes you’ll have a comprehensive written plan that’s built for your business.

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State-of-the-Art Mobile Interface

STATE-OF-THE-ART MOBILE INTERFACE

Reference existing safety plans in seconds and take down critical compliance information on the fly.

SINGLE-SOURCE DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT

Easily upload existing plans and policies and share frequently-referenced templates with others in your organization.

Single-Source Document Management
Functional Employee Oversight

FUNCTIONAL EMPLOYEE OVERSIGHT

Effortlessly manage roles and permissions to control who can view and maintain your written plans.

Writing your safety plans has never been easier!

SAFETY MANAGEMENT SUITE'S MOST POPULAR WRITTEN TEMPLATES INCLUDE:

    • Combustible Dust
    • Bloodborne Pathogens
    • Emergency Action
    • Fire Prevention
    • Electrical Safety
    • Forklift Operation
    • Respiratory Protection
    • Hazard Communication
    • Emergency Response Plan
Written Plans FAQs

WRITTEN SAFETY PLANS FAQs

Written safety plans (or programs) are records of how an establishment is protecting (or plans to protect) employees overall for a safety or health hazard. The words plan and program can be and have been used interchangeably. Both simply document what a facility is doing to keep its employees safe and healthful.

OSHA has over 35 written plan, program, procedure, or manual requirements throughout OSHA 29 CFR 1910 for general industry. Over 20 more are found in 29 CFR 1926 for construction. While that’s a lot of written plans, it’s unlikely that all of them apply to your establishment. You’ll want to review the requirements one-by-one to see which ones apply.

Yes, OSHA allows a written plan to be kept in either paper or electronic format, as long as it meets all other requirements of the standard in question. Where the OSHA standard requires that the written plan be made available to employees, you must ensure that employees know how to access the document and that there are no barriers to employee access. If you keep plans electronically, consider how they will be made available to employees and to any OSHA inspector who knocks on your door. Printing a copy is usually acceptable for OSHA inspectors.

Safety plans are specific to each regulation where they are required. Where OSHA regulations call for a written plan or program, the agency may list the required written plan elements to include. However, in some cases, no elements are specified.

While OSHA does not require it, translating plans is a good idea if you have employees who don’t read English. In some cases, it may be critical, such as for lockout/tagout procedures. Your programs should be in a language all employees can understand and follow.