World-class OSHA recordkeeping and reporting tools
Incident Tracking

incident center

The J. J. Keller® INCIDENT CENTER provides unlimited access to a variety of world-class OSHA recordkeeping and reporting tools. Flexible and mobile-friendly, it makes it easy to analyze, report, manage and prevent workplace incidents.

PRE-RELEASE TRIAL

Have wide-ranging compliance needs? Try the full SAFETY MANAGEMENT SUITE.

EXPERIENCE THE BENEFITS OF A
SUPERIOR incident tracking SOLUTION

Dynamic OSHA 300 Incident Tracking

DYNAMIC INCIDENT TRACKING

Evaluate injuries, illnesses, near misses, property damage, equipment failure, safety observations and more within a single, cloud-based solution.

FLEXIBLE REPORTING CAPABILITIES

Implement corrective actions and download compliant FROI forms that can be attached to your incident reports.

Flexible Reporting Capabilities
World-Class OSHA Training

WORLD-CLASS OSHA TRAINING

Utilize award-winning OSHA training developed by our trusted team of in-house regulatory experts.

Easily manage OSHA reporting requirements!

Have wide-ranging compliance needs? Try the full SAFETY MANAGEMENT SUITE.

Ed Zalewski | Sr. Editor, EHS | J. J. Keller & Associates

When a doctor says time off is needed…

Employees who visit a personal physician regarding a workplace injury might provide a doctor’s note saying the employee cannot work for a few days. You can ask the employee to provide a medical description of why he or she cannot work. For example, if the employee drove himself to the doctor’s office, he should be able to drive himself to work. Generally, a doctor should describe limitations necessary for the employee’s recovery, but the employer decides whether it can accommodate those limitations by providing restricted work.

 

Ed Zalewski | Sr. Editor, EHS

OSHA Recordkeeping & Incident Tracking FAQs

Incident Tracking FAQS

Under the OSHA Recordkeeping regulation (29 CFR 1904), covered employers are required to prepare and maintain records of serious occupational injuries and illnesses, using the OSHA 300 Log. This information is important for employers, workers, and OSHA in evaluating the safety of a workplace, understanding industry hazards, and implementing worker protections to reduce and eliminate hazards.

Under OSHA’s Recordkeeping regulation, covered employers are required to keep and maintain records of occupational injury and illness. This is information is important for employers, workers, and OSHA in evaluating the safety of a workplace, understanding industry hazards, and implementing worker protections to reduce and eliminate hazards.

An injury must meet three conditions to be recordable. First, it must be work-related; nearly any injury that happens in the work environment will be work-related, unless a specific exemption applies. Second, it must be a new case; if the employee as a repeat injury, the employee must have recovered completely before the reinjury. Finally, the case must meet one or more of the general recording criteria; this means the injury required medical treatment beyond first aid, or resulted in restricted work or lost days, or met one of the other criteria.

Under the OSHA Recordkeeping regulation, covered employers are required to prepare and maintain records of serious occupational injuries and illnesses, using the OSHA 300 Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses. This information is important for employers, workers, and OSHA in evaluating the safety of a workplace, understanding industry hazards, and implementing worker protections to reduce and eliminate hazards.

The OSHA Form 300A annual summary must be posted no later than February 1 of each year, listing the total injuries from the previous year. That form must remain posted until at least April 30. Employers must post a copy in each establishment in a conspicuous place where notices to employees are customarily posted and must ensure that the annual summary is not defaced or covered by other material.

All employers with 250 or more employees must annually submit the 300A using OSHA’s e-reporting portal. In addition, employers with 20 to 249 employers in certain designated industries must submit also. These industries are listed by NAICS codes in 1904.41 Appendix A.